Tag Archives: Share.TEC

What do teachers need for sharing and creating knowledge circa OER? #abs87

This paper, presented by researcher Beatriz Carramolino, described work on Share.TEC, which I understand as a web portal searching many European-and-beyond repositories of learning material — some open, some not — especially suited to teacher educators. Share.TEC was created in hope of providing a simple way of finding and reusing digital content useful to teacher educators. Beatriz described the attention given to the search facility, searching not just on the usual things such as format (video, sound, whatever), but also on language and on pedagogical qualities. Share.Tec also allows for groups to be formed, and also a section called ‘My Contribution’ encouraging the sharing of resources.

Beatriz Carramolino presenting on Share.TEC

Beatriz Carramolino presenting on Share.TEC

Beatriz told us that only 52% of the resources were OER, the rest were not only not openly-licensed, they also require payment. An important finding of her research is that most users of Share.TEC take but do not share back, a common situation with online environments that have attempted to encourage sharing. Beatriz also told us that overall they concluded that not enough attention had been given to the design of the portal to encourage community.  Apparently, it is not enough to include a facility to form online groups. Another finding was that teachers were not putting tags on their materials. Tags and other metadata seem to be the boring bit, the part for someone else to do, but they are really just as important as the item itself.

Building a community around the give and take of OER has, to my eyes, only worked well in a few places. HUMBOX is a good example — humanities educators share and take material in a trusted environment in which they know each other to some extent. YouTube allows for discussion and a form of community. But I cannot really think of any others. If you know of other examples of good community forming around open materials, please let me know in the comments!

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, SCORE Research Fellow, University of Leicester

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