Tag Archives: open access

Sharing @ 100%? – arguments for a less selective approach to reporting OER activity – Chris Pegler #abs119

#abs119

Abstract available from https://www.medev.ac.uk/oer13/119/view/

The consensus (on Twitter anyway) was that the opening keynote of #oer13 was pretty good. NUS president Toni Pearce spoke engagingly about the student perspective of University education in general and OER in particular and Chris Pegler introduced her session by acknowledging so…but emphasising that the educator’s view is (or should be?) different.

We were also warned that “there will be groupwork” and Chris evoked sharing and the open landscape asking “who are we open with?”, identifying that open behaviour tends to become ever more restrictive in concentric circles away from the creator:

Who are we 'open' with?

Who are we ‘open’ with?

Then came the group work where we were asked to “Talk to 1-2 other people nearby. Identify  some resources which you would be happy to share at one of the very local levels. Think about whether you are also happy to allow remix at these levels”.

As a non-pedagog I did necessarily feel qualified to contribute to the conversation on the same terms as my group (although I am committed to sharing sometimes half baked ideas of my own). There was some discussion of “value” – would this resource (complete or not) be of value? – also of context, just releasing stuff – unfinished – into the wild is of limited use unless the community can continue the “conversation” – this my own sense of blogging from a technical/infrastructural perspective – like the conversation in this room, open dissemination allows us to “converse” and formulate our own perspectives.

Trust is key (not to mention time and motivation), not only in one’s community to accept your contribution to the conversation in the appropriate spirit but also faith in oneself. Confidence that comes with practice.

More group discussion (good pedagogy!)…What would it take to share more widely and what are the barriers? What are your concerns? Some tweets from the session include:

Chris brought the session to a close by emphasising that immature outputs can offer valuable insight that may be lost in more polished material; in addition there is a potential dissemination bias if we over select our outputs. By way of example Chris cited candid mid project meetings of the ukoer programme. The final reports of those same projects did not capture the vibrancy of mid project meetings when live projects were exploring their still developing outputs.

Final question: Trust or Time? Both?

Final question: Trust or Time? Both?

At the end of the session, answering a question, Chris conceded that the “100%” of her title was a little mischevious. Rhetorical. Impossible (and not necessarily desirable) but ultimately, open is as open does and if we are continually aspiring to “showcase” resources we are missing a huge and valuable learning experience.

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OER13 pre-conference tweets

We are now only a few hours from the start of OER13, and I’m feeling quite excited! At the end of OER12, when Jonathan Darby gathered a group of us and suggested that we begin working on OER13 even though there was no official money to do so and we would have to do everything as volunteers, I had my doubts that such a thing could be pulled off. But here we are on the eve of the conference — with a venue, keynotes, presenters, posters, and most of all delegates.

We are hoping to record and make available all presentations. At the same time, we will be blogging on presentations, right here on this blog.

I thought it appropriate to include here the tweets discussing OER13, for a taste of things to come. Follow the link below — and hopefull see you in Nottingham! –Terese Bird, University of Leicester

[View the story “OER13 Conference” on Storify]

OER on staff profiles?

A quick introduction, an inevitable plug for my lightning talk at the conference next week and a question for the community.

So, I am Nick Sheppard, Repository Developer at Leeds Metropolitan University. I also sit on the committee of UKCoRR (UK Council of Research Repositories) and on the Jorum Steering Group. I am particularly interested in potential synergies between Open Access to research and OER (and Open Education more generally) and my lightning talk (at 11.00 am next Wednesday!) is entitled Libraries, OA research and OER: towards symbiosis? (see here for full abstract)

And the question:

Are you aware of examples of OER included on staff profiles at UK HE institutions?

Off the top of my head I am only aware of Bebop at the University of Lincoln* (HumBox also incorporates nice user profiles but that is subject based rather than institutional, not sure about EdShare?)

* “the Bebop plugin has provided a way for staff to publish a curated list of their teaching resources, which can be displayed on their official Staff Directory profile”

It is increasingly important for research staff to have an online profile that lists their research outputs (and ideally links to an accessible version of the full text) so why not OER? Perhaps there are lots of good examples of folk doing this, if you know of any please let me know!

Spotlight on Jorum

Jorum is the best-known UK repository of free and open educational resources (OER).  In the run-up to the OER13 conference, I had the chance to ask Jorum team members what they do over at Jorum, and why they are looking forward to the conference:

Paul Madley: I‘ve recently come on board at MIMAS where I’ll be principally developing the public-facing Jorum website, I look forward to working with colleagues from other institutions as we move forward, which is why I’m excited about meeting and talking with people at OER13.

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Joy Hooper, Jorum Business Development Officer: I’ve just joined the Jorum team so this is my first OER conference. I’m looking forward to meeting up with practitioners who are using OERs within the teaching and learning programmes. I’m keen to hear about the highlights and the challenges faced by users and institutions. All the key themes have relevance for me but the third theme, ‘Expectation’, has particular relevance, given my new role. This conference provides an ideal opportunity for me to talk about the new ‘Powered by Jorum’ offerings, which are designed to enable institutions to enhance their own branded, tailored views onto their content in Jorum: in other words, we can help you to create your own OER service.

I’m Jackie Carter, Jorum director and OER13 conference co-chair. I’m looking forward to hearing more about the bridges being built between open communities. The OER community is a vibrant and learned group and OER13 is a great opportunity for us all – including the Jorum team – to reflect on how far we have come, as well as helping us to think about the direction we want to take next.

I am Anja Le Blanc, one of the new additions to Jorum of the last year. I am working as a technical developer on the Jorum repository. Over the last ten years I went to a good number of conferences in a wide diversity of academic fields and I enjoyed the variety of ‘personalities’ each of the conferences provided. I am looking forward to getting to know the OER community at OER13 and to learn and be inspired by their enthusiasm for education.

Siobhán Burke -My role at Jorum is to work with educators and learning technologists who want to use OER content and also help facilitate sharing their own OERs with Jorum. As this is my first OER conference, I am looking forward to meeting face to face with members of the OER community.

I am Sarah Currier, Jorum Service Manager, so I’m responsible for the successful delivery of Jorum’s services. I’m really looking forward to OER13 this year, because we have so much exciting news to share with the OER community. We have a Beta of our fabulous new search and reporting features: you can find OERs more easily, and you can get data about the use of your OERs. And we have developed a range of added value options for institutions and communities that want their own branded, tailored views onto their con tent in Jorum: in other words, we can help create your own OER service to your users, with access to Jorum’s collections included. I would love to talk to folk at OER13 about Jorum’s future, and about what you would like from Jorum. I am also co-presenting a paper on the JLeRN project, so you can also talk to me about paradata: information about the social sharing and usage of OERs.

Ben Ryan:  I am the Jorum Technical Manager responsible for the infrastructure, development and support of the Jorum platform and proto-service.   I am looking forward to discussing the recent Jorum developments and the future direction of features and functionality development and discussing the recent work on user interface and experience.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, University of Leicester

OER13 and the open-access landscape

Day 1 of Cambridge 2012 Conference

Day 1 of Cambridge 2012 Conference

Welcome to this first post of OER13: Evidence, Experience, Expectations, the official blog of the OER13 Conference. OER13, as the preceding conferences of this series, seeks to advance the impact of open educational resources and practice both globally and locally in the UK. OER13 will take place at University of Nottingham on 26 and 27th March 2013, and there is still time to book a place.

Looking about at the open-access landscape as OER13 looms before us, it is almost unbelievable to see where we are. Not many foresaw the mushrooming numbers of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) being launched, including some fairly-spectacular MOOC meltdowns. Here in the UK, the Open University along with other universities launched the new FutureLearn MOOC platform just last December. And Minister for Universities and Science David Willetts’ announcement last year that publicly-funded research publication should be openly accessible is seen by some as a threat to academic freedom as much as it likely threatens current publishing models. Against this backdrop, OER13 will seek to examine and discuss the evidence, experience, and expectations of open educational practice in a way that will both enlighten and enable.

If you would like to join in blogging this event — either before or during, even a single post would be great– please reply to this post or tweet @OER13.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, University of Leicester