Tag Archives: MOOC

Notes from the facilitated discussion on the Experience theme, day 2

So, are you experienced? Have you ever been experienced? Well, I have.

So, are you experienced? Have you ever been experienced? Well, I have.

Many thanks to everyone who came and took part in the stimulating and wide ranging discussion in room B52 on the experience theme. Despite the room being a very formal lecture theatre we managed to have some interesting exchanges about how we might encourage academic practices amongst our colleagues (I hesitate to use the word open or transparent as I don’t think they reflect the direction the discussion took).

Special thanks to Professor Megan Quentin-Baxter for taking the following (almost) verbatim notes:

Problems and practice and the implications for practice.

I feel a bit like an interloper in the conference discipline – media department archaeology etc. – I don’t come from this world. Whatever this world is.

The questions that are here are about the world of educational development and practice.

Computers will be interesting when they disappear.

OP will be interesting when it disappears.

In accordance with what Pat was saying earlier on then.

I am sort of outside of this comunity as well. Twitter, copyright. We need more education. Not too frightened of it.

There is that kind of education for us and for our students. What should they be doing. What should we be doing.

Staff development and cpd. JIS legal has been doing very good stuff.

SH had been doing stuff like that in Ncl for the last 6 months or so. But you only get the people who know that there is a problem to be solved.

In my experience obstacle s is time. You need tie to take understand things. What it meants to be CC licenced. As authoritative as it comes and with good intentions. I edont have this time

Is it time or fear? Both but time is most important. I am working part time and I am at capacity. If you make it official then people don’t engage you have to make it part of everything else that you do.

Embed it in other activities such as other staff development. Julian I don’t know how you get through to the lone academic who has done it for years. Lots of other people out there. I am at a loss to know how to spread this wide. Nuanced to us. You have to kjnow a  lot. Enganced learning, open learning, you have to think differently. They don’t get it and link it over there because they don’t get it.

Anna – open educational practice. Same as when we tired to get people to use computers. Lots of things to learn. You have to make it ubiqiutious.

Sean if they are brilliant at what they do (staff) does it matter computer slide projector, engaging students.

How can students help? Students putting pressure on academics.

Getting students to engage has been important with oer was difficult but I am on Twitter and I tweet OERs to them they are rubbish at using Moodle but they are using resources. They are not very good at demanding – we have to tell them and they are interested but they are not proactive. I talk to students about what my role is at the beginning of the first year so that they know more about me.

Is it a lack of understanding of OERs? It is not the student’s job – students think that they are doing your work for you.

A quality issue if it doesn’t ?

Student will look at stuff again.

With the issues of OER there is a concept there is an empahsis on asking students to create their rown learning pathways. Homogenisation. Competitive environment.

Students are paying a lot of money (England, international). Client relationship. We had the issue recently of providing moducless

Have we managed to embody exciting new pedagogies in oers/moocs?

Spreading open practice – danger that evangelism can lose critical faculty

Where is open? What is open? Less about pedagogy and more about learning

Cant provide models because it would make it too easy for students to complete the assignment. Reluctance because students have travelled that path.

Networking – people. Research

Hang out in the same places. We know this. There is no obvious way of marking ourselves out. Pages that you create on resources. I am an open academy. Some Badges. – Not a lot of ways to identify

Signed up a year ago (OER pledge) a paper and nothing has happened.

We have to go with everything that has happened. Showcase of use of something for a year institution recolonizing by some … no factors need to be

Some kind That is what we have to change for the students to create the context. Pedagogy. Some desire if you took x student and tll them the outcomes that have have to achieve and then the evidence that they have to produce.

If we take away the open, leaving changes in practices. What makes good practice. Better practice. I started out when everything fro the OU was in print. Programmes on the BBC. What happened before it was recorded. Correspondence. Difficult to say that the students viewed that time as better or worse than it is now. Technologies are available and used .

Online conferencing in1988. 2005 before the policy that all courses should have some sort of online presence. How long it takes for change to happen.

The question from me about where the openness is helpful is that people in the OU and across the sector. How do you inculcate the sharing part of practice.

You have to get that activity recognised.

Recognise that type of activity. You have to have a recognition and reward system. MOOCs. Might make us look good. Books as MOOCS but you share books.

Transparency. Always using things in different ways. Very open about what they want to do. The technowizz is not transparent. Transparency with colleagues. Try to sell the benefits of saving time by being transparent. For the students to sell it to them. This looks flashy and weird it might not work. Students might be talking about

Why am I paying for this? Massive transformation – in our old world we had control but we are now in the situation where what we produe might be duplicated 1000 times. You can’t build value systems around.

The opne agenda is getting from that old situation to a new situation. If you tell people that they can only get that info from that place that one place then they will find answers elsewhere. Drop in the ocean. How it makes you think about being in a teaching sigutaiont. Terrible basis for going forward.

MQB noted the look on the face of Vice Chancellors  who were lensing forward thinking well if all knowledge is on line then what is the role of the university? One conclusion was that we would have to teach our academics to teach.

Growth in the content agenda.  Bookshops libraries. Chalkboards. Taking down the notes and transcribing them. I

There has been more emphasis on the creation of resources rather than the creation of learning experiences.

Using content and rich media. One animation, cost of multiple animations and economies of scale. What is best use of funding. Why redraw something if you can use the original.

Quality of resources, quality of lecturers. Are we prepared to keep paying 100times more for something. Universities .

Changing perceptions of student.

Fragmented practices.

Top down directives are needed.

Early days for us including elearning.

Change of universities.

Not as fast as what goes on around it.

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The role of openess in educational innovation, universities in tsunami of changes #OER13 #absOEII #abs127

Wodecki started his presentation on The role of openess in educational innovation, universities in tsunami of changes, to present th concept of open and openess, with some slides with different aspects of openess,

IMG_1321[1]

He stated that open and openess have a wide range of meanings and vary in different cultures and contexts, he ended up with teh discussion on coding and the open Mozilla Badge movement.

Furthermore he argued that open means:

  • I can enter
  • Everyone can enter
  • Diverse and tolerant
  • I can change it , I can influence it
  • They are listening
  • I can use it in many ways and places
  • It is free
  • It is online
  • It is informal
  • It has many meanings and many levels

Wodecki continued in the same way with the concept of innovation, and stated that innovation means improvement that works and new stakeholders with adds real value. He argued that a tsunami is on its way in education and especially higher education, Society is faceing an elderly population and that consumption and technology spreads faster today. Thus the role of universities are changing adn disruption is high. Universities have to concern more on lifelong learning, lead the change and to be more practical due to openess and innovation. Steps to be taken are to work on best practice, take the stakeholders perspective, advanced cases (OER, MOOC), guidlines for going open and the recommendation is that policy makers should support it. He argued that universities has to lead that change and listen to the market and stakeholders. Stakeholders as students, academics, international networks and companies. Feasibility studies and external market analises is of most importance. Change leaders may be crucial in the development processes.

What leeds to the success?

  • Quality
  • Flexibility of study programmes
  • Participation in EU programme
  • Modern infrastructure
  • Listening to the market
  • Well-equipped labs
  • Social and professional regional embedding
  • Student professor relationship
  • International aspect
  • Frequent travelling, especiallu for decision makers
  • Teach fundamentals

Do ICT matters?

Wodecki argues that  ICT really matters as development with ICT runs faster, cheaper, richer, wider. Steps which has to be taken are to work on best practice, to take the stakeholders perspectives, to work with advanced cases (OER, MOOC) and guidelines for universities to go open and to be innovative. It is strongly recommended that policy makers should support the openess development. The development can be illustrated in the image as below.

It is argued that universities has to  lead the changes to go open. With open edcuation more students will be involved. More students will  give

  • more inspiration
  • different perspectives
  • more diversity, more culture, religion, lifestyles
  • must adopt teaching methods
  • better feedback
  • can experiment
  • more needs, I learn that one method can´t satisfy everybody
  • creative meltdown
  • more talent to hount
  • more better students

In summary universities need efficient organizational interfaces with the external world. Otherwise…

This blog Ebba Ossiannilsson, Lund University, Sweden, @EbbaOssian

Students and OERs: Exploring the possibilities #abs125

Presenter: Toni Pearce, NUS Vice President (Further Education)

Session: Keynote #abs125

Toni presented an insightful and thought provoking keynote based on the results of a wide ranging survey of student attitudes and online behaviour, which will be published later in the year.  The keynote was very well received and generated considerable positive discussion at the conference and on the twitter backchannel.  These are just a few of the points Toni raised.

The NUS is a political organisation interested in the expansion of educational opportunities, social justice and social cohesion.  What are the benefits of open education for groups that are excluded from traditional education? Students are not a homogenous group and some are better positioned to gain advantage from open education than others.

Students are conservative in their use of OERs.  Many do use OERs but they are more likely to use them if they are used as part of course or recommended by lecturer. “Traditional” students (i.e. young students in full time education) are very firm about the value of face to face learning and will defend lectures to the death. Lecturing is not an out of date mode of teaching, though podcasting and video captures of lectures is becoming increasingly popular.

Students appreciate the convenience of OERs, they are used to access content at home and revise topics.  OERs are primarily used as a labour saving device, not to change how students learn. This is not transforming education; it is just making it more convenient.  OERs have not unsettled traditional hierarchies of knowledge.

A small number of students use OERs before entering HE to learn about HE institutions and the experience of higher education.  More structured support is needed to facilitate this transition. 

In determining the value and reliability of any resource, look is important.  Students tend to equate look with value.  If a resource looks professional, it is regarded as being reliable.

Students struggle to find appropriate OERs, the volume of resources is overwhelming.  Some students bemoaned the failure to develop the equivalent of Dewey Decimal classification for online resources (!), though clearly this is not a viable option. Students lack sophisticated search skills, they need support to situate their use of learning resources in the context of developing their knowledge.

Students often share resources on twitter and facebook, which many find easier to use than VLEs.  Sharing is a relationship for cyclical advantage, not altruism, and students will keep resources to themselves in order to gain competitive advantage. Few students create their own OERs or adapt existing resources.  While they are happy to use OERs created by others they are unlikely to create their own resources due to concerns they would be co-opted by others. It is also concerning that some students believe that people who are not registered to education institutions should not have access to resources.

Current students are not the key audience for OERs. Education has a tendency to leave you with a desire to keep learning forever.  OER has the potential to expand access to learning and make education more widely available to those excluded from traditional educational institutions.  There is a widespread belief that OERs can bridge the gap between formal and informal learning experiences.

Students place great value on being able to work together with other students.   Technology can be isolating despite access to more and more resources and technologies that support collaboration.  Students worry about the lack of learning community and value traditional study environments.  Communities give us the assurance that others share our experiences. We can accomplish more as a community than alone as individuals.  Our identity comes from the communities that we are part of, which is why web 2.0 social applications can be so effective. The biggest opportunity for OERs is to create communities of education for those that do not have them.

Education is about collaboration not passive consumption but students have little interest in structuring their own learning journeys.  However we are moving into unpredictable territory and students need to take control of change.

Will institutions be able to continue offering OER for free? Openness sits uneasily beside marketization and competitiveness and increasing fees will only exacerbate this. No one quite knows what to do about MOOCs.  Should we try to control the growth of MOOCs or should we let them proliferate?  Opinions are becoming very polarised, but maybe it’s all hype like the Internet bubble.  However MOOCs are important because they have started a public conversation about educational technology and part of that conversation has to be about whether openness will be swallowed up by privatisation and competition.  We need a balanced thoughtful discussion about the future of education.

OpenJoyce: ‘a great field was to be opened up in the line of opening up’ , #abs83

We present OpenJopenjoyceoyce – a new OER which takes a service-based and community-focused approach to ‘open’.

OpenJoyce is a collection of resources and a community around the author James Joyce.

At noon on day one of OER13, OpenJoyce was presented by Cleo Hanaway from the University of Oxford and Pat Lockley of Pgogy. The other authors, Mr Ronan Crowley, and Dr Elizabeth Switaj were not present.

The abstract for the session can be found at https://www.medev.ac.uk/oer13/programme/#83 You can access OpenJoyce at http://openjoyce.com/

This lively presentation started off with Cleo, a self confessed Joyce geek, who is now cultural engagement officer at the University of Reading. Pat introduced himself as having done nothing with his life….

Pat and Cleo started us off with introducing us to different ideas of ‘open’ and pattern recognition in Ulysses. They made visualisations and put them online, this grew into about 20 visualisation tools and how they work in Ulysses. These went to Dublin to a Joyce conference, where they met up with Ronan, who needed some tools, and Pat built more tools….

Pat made a MOOC, and met Elizabeth who wanted to run a MOOC on Joyce, which then turned into a communty. Kind of a lighthouse… to broadcast out to people. 117 words in Latin have some meaning of ‘open’.

What does ‘open’ mean to you? Was survey of one question which went out to Twitter and on the Internet. They had about 50 anonymous responses – which were really quite carefully considered as far as the examples shown demonstrated.

We were introduced to several notions of ‘open’, including reciprocity. Is the idea of ‘open’ moving towards a more public domain definition? There is no preferred licence on OpenJoyce. All code available, sharing over multiple sites, having fun with the vagueness of open, and didactic openness. OpenJoyce is trying to be completely collaborative and take the concept forward in new ways. it is moving away from the the idea of having sole intellectual ownership of an idea of tool.

OpenJoyce is now looking for more people to get involved, it is explicitly not about commodity dumping. They do not want it to be a simple broadcasting process. Already have one MOOCow, with two more coming, and possible funding. Though it is really hard to do stuff outside of University constructs.

No prior knowledge of Joyce is necessary, and they are interested in seeing how far ‘open’ can go. A small grant will hopefully enable a conference on OpenJoyce and also small amounts of money to enable more people to contribute to the site.

As Megan said – Blimey!

OER13 and the open-access landscape

Day 1 of Cambridge 2012 Conference

Day 1 of Cambridge 2012 Conference

Welcome to this first post of OER13: Evidence, Experience, Expectations, the official blog of the OER13 Conference. OER13, as the preceding conferences of this series, seeks to advance the impact of open educational resources and practice both globally and locally in the UK. OER13 will take place at University of Nottingham on 26 and 27th March 2013, and there is still time to book a place.

Looking about at the open-access landscape as OER13 looms before us, it is almost unbelievable to see where we are. Not many foresaw the mushrooming numbers of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) being launched, including some fairly-spectacular MOOC meltdowns. Here in the UK, the Open University along with other universities launched the new FutureLearn MOOC platform just last December. And Minister for Universities and Science David Willetts’ announcement last year that publicly-funded research publication should be openly accessible is seen by some as a threat to academic freedom as much as it likely threatens current publishing models. Against this backdrop, OER13 will seek to examine and discuss the evidence, experience, and expectations of open educational practice in a way that will both enlighten and enable.

If you would like to join in blogging this event — either before or during, even a single post would be great– please reply to this post or tweet @OER13.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, University of Leicester