Promoting open practices with the UK PSRB/subject associations in medicine #abs46

Claire Cunningham of ASME presenting the "Promoting Open Approaches' project

Claire Cunningham of ASME presenting the “Promoting Open Approaches’ project

The ‘Promoting open practices’ project, led by ASME (the Association for the Study of Medical Education), is examining the policies, practices and processes in several organisations (including ASME, the General Medical Council, and the Wellcome Trust) with the intention of adopting open approaches and sharing good practice through the development of individual case studies.

Victor Oatway shared the common Issues they found amongst the organisations: limited knowledge, some had never heard of CC, it’s not easy to consistently identify the owners of materials, educators not knowing how the materials can be used (comparing paper, hardcopy, electronic versions of douments). Often, the print version of a document had different information than the online electronic document. Takedown policies were rarely posted on sites. Even those working on the project found themselves asking “Is this document even from ASME?” But on the plus side, there was an enthusiasm to make resources available, and a desire amongst staff to make changes, together. New staff training is seen as the way forward, toward the project goal of creating overall open policy for the members.

Having recently seen for myself some of the difficulties navigating locked-down medical online networks and resources, I’m beginning to see that sheer convenience is probably the most significant driver toward openness in the medical field particularly.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist and SCORE Research Fellow, University of Leicester

The role of openess in educational innovation, universities in tsunami of changes #OER13 #absOEII #abs127

Wodecki started his presentation on The role of openess in educational innovation, universities in tsunami of changes, to present th concept of open and openess, with some slides with different aspects of openess,

IMG_1321[1]

He stated that open and openess have a wide range of meanings and vary in different cultures and contexts, he ended up with teh discussion on coding and the open Mozilla Badge movement.

Furthermore he argued that open means:

  • I can enter
  • Everyone can enter
  • Diverse and tolerant
  • I can change it , I can influence it
  • They are listening
  • I can use it in many ways and places
  • It is free
  • It is online
  • It is informal
  • It has many meanings and many levels

Wodecki continued in the same way with the concept of innovation, and stated that innovation means improvement that works and new stakeholders with adds real value. He argued that a tsunami is on its way in education and especially higher education, Society is faceing an elderly population and that consumption and technology spreads faster today. Thus the role of universities are changing adn disruption is high. Universities have to concern more on lifelong learning, lead the change and to be more practical due to openess and innovation. Steps to be taken are to work on best practice, take the stakeholders perspective, advanced cases (OER, MOOC), guidlines for going open and the recommendation is that policy makers should support it. He argued that universities has to lead that change and listen to the market and stakeholders. Stakeholders as students, academics, international networks and companies. Feasibility studies and external market analises is of most importance. Change leaders may be crucial in the development processes.

What leeds to the success?

  • Quality
  • Flexibility of study programmes
  • Participation in EU programme
  • Modern infrastructure
  • Listening to the market
  • Well-equipped labs
  • Social and professional regional embedding
  • Student professor relationship
  • International aspect
  • Frequent travelling, especiallu for decision makers
  • Teach fundamentals

Do ICT matters?

Wodecki argues that  ICT really matters as development with ICT runs faster, cheaper, richer, wider. Steps which has to be taken are to work on best practice, to take the stakeholders perspectives, to work with advanced cases (OER, MOOC) and guidelines for universities to go open and to be innovative. It is strongly recommended that policy makers should support the openess development. The development can be illustrated in the image as below.

It is argued that universities has to  lead the changes to go open. With open edcuation more students will be involved. More students will  give

  • more inspiration
  • different perspectives
  • more diversity, more culture, religion, lifestyles
  • must adopt teaching methods
  • better feedback
  • can experiment
  • more needs, I learn that one method can´t satisfy everybody
  • creative meltdown
  • more talent to hount
  • more better students

In summary universities need efficient organizational interfaces with the external world. Otherwise…

This blog Ebba Ossiannilsson, Lund University, Sweden, @EbbaOssian

Reaching out with OER: the public-facing open scholar and the benevolent academy #abs11

Leigh-Ann Perryman and Tony Coughlan presented an engaging look at the notion of a public-facing open scholar, an academic with digital skills and open practice, joining in with a community in order to share knowledge, materials, and be a general help.

Dr Leigh-Anne Perryman shows some examples of public-facing scholars (but are they open scholars?)

Dr Leigh-Anne Perryman shows some examples of public-facing scholars (but are they open scholars?)

In 2012 Tony began collating open material for the voluntary sector and distributing them on the Facebook page CYP Media. But this seemed limited, and he began to look deeper into this issue. He found a very active online child welfare community which had been operating since 2003 on a completely anonymous basis. He spent time reading until he felt he could understand their needs and he shared open resources which could meet some of those needs. Using a framework for understanding community, he found that this community’s ‘creative capability’ was already very well developed and he helped best by joining in the conversation and himself learning how they discovered resources already. Tony learnt about many new sources of information he hadn’t known, from group members. He also found that the anonymity created a level playing field.

Among the implications of this case study: being a public-facing open scholar is likely to take a lot of time. Listening to needs includes learning about culture and interaction modes. A public-facing open scholar may need to explain how resources relate to community needs.

Leigh-Anne and Tony concluded that public-facing open scholars have the potential to extend the benefical impact of OER, to prompt institutions to release new OER to meet the needs of people outside HE, and to help communities. BUT: are academies benevolent enough to let them do these things?

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist and SCORE Research Fellow

#abs94 Making OER available on multiple platforms (U-Now, iBooks, eBooks)

Andy Beggan presented this paper from the University of Nottingham, which described OpenNottingham’s adventures in eBooks. The work came out of the PARiS project, which created 10 x 10 credit modules with 5 converted to eBooks.

Most of the staff involved had never worked with OER before. Existing third party OER was reused wherever possible.

The focus groups were very positive about the work, and staff and students changed their practice as a result.

The team used iBookAuthor to lay out the content. The publishing process was straightforward, as was licensing the work. The eBooks themselves are fairly slick and of a high standard aesthetically, and available both in the Apple store and as ePubs.

As far as eBooks are concerned there was a range of student views on their usefulness. 5 eBooks were released as free downloads, cc licensed images were sued to deliver enhanced presentations and ePub and other formats  versions were created to ensure availability across platforms and distributors.

Conversion to ePub had widened access to OERs. iBooks most popular downloaded format. Comparative focus groups will yield more data. Next steps – NOOCs via Moodle, which will give a better understanding of the usage of the eBooks.

Wikipedia Education Program: open educational practice on a global scale #abs70

Martin Poulter a volunteer for Wikipedia, presented a passionate defense of the idea and practice of writing articles for Wikipedia, as digital literacy and open practice. In fact, the sort of skills required to successfully write an article on Wikipedia — digital literacy, critical thinking, good review practice, and it helps to be a pedant — are not far away from the skills we hope any HE degree student would demonstrate and learn.

Martin Poulter of Wikipedia

Martin Poulter of Wikipedia

Martin advocated incorporating the writing of good, well-researched and well-referenced Wikipedia articles into a course as a form of assessment, allowing students to research, write, post, and defend their own work on some stopic. Wikimedia offers to come in and help with this process — hence, the Wikipedia Education Program. Martin made a compelling case for this sort of incorporation of open educational practice into formal learning and it made me wonder why I don’t write more Wikipedia articles myself.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, University of Leicester

Libraries and the OER Community #abs30

Gema’s slides from her presentation

@gema_bueno presented on how librarians and libraries are involved in the OER Communities.

I’m not a librarian, so I tweeted to ask if any library has an OER policy. Obviously Nottingham has Open Nottingham, and Leeds has an OER policy, but I am not explicitly aware of a library with a commitment to OER as a policy (perhaps Open Michigan).

How well the classical librarian skill set suits OERs and OER promotion – and also assessing the quality of OERs. This could be seen as similar to books, but I assume lecturers do much of the book vetting and quality assurance.

Are librarians also the people to be promoting licenses and discussing copyright issues directly? Classically OER production might not involve librarians, and then librarians may be outside the OER loop.

Gemma suggested a structure for librarians to get involved – the slogan being “from containers to content to context” – suggesting librarians cataloging both their own institution and the world’s OERs – but would steps such as this need institutional, professional or national bodies to co-ordinate this work?

Reflection through transition: the role of OERs in bridging informal to formal learning #abs106

Lindsay Hewitt from Open University in Scotland presented on ‘The Reflection Toolkit’ – a five hour self-study unit which aims to get the user started on thinking about themselves, who they are, what they want to do in their present situation, and how they can work towards doing what it is they want. The platform LabSpace (a subset of OpenLearn as I understand it) was used to build the toolkit.

Lindsay Hewitt of Open University in Scotland on using OER to widen participation in higher education

Lindsay Hewitt of Open University in Scotland on using OER to widen participation in higher education

How is it being used? Glasgow Caledonian Uni’s ‘Caledonian Club’ — community engagement initiative. even to primary schools and feeder nursery schools, has rolled out a 5-week course on reflection which is hoped will open up learning opportunities for local parents and carers. The course is built around the reflection toolkit. I love the idea of open learning materials and open practice being key to widening participation in practical ways such as this. Check out the reflection toolkit here.

Terese Bird, Learning Technologist, SCORE Research Fellow, University of Leicester